English Literature (Week 4)

Day 13

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each,  term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: aphorismautobiographyblank verse

Reading

  1. Read about Benjamin Franklin, the writer.
  2. Read pages 10-12 and pages 38-39 of The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin.
  3. How does Franklin feel about human nature? How does he feel about education? Do you agree or disagree with his views?
  4. Which virtue on Franklin’s list do you believe is the most important? Which one would you say is the least important? Why?
  5. When we read an autobiography, we should ask ourselves if the writer is being objective with how he presents himself or if he’s actually creating a character and idealized version of himself.  If you were writing an autobiography, are there things about yourself that you would want to leave out?
  6. Read about Benjamin Franklin’s Poor Richard’s Almanac in the article, “The Prominent and Prodigiously Popular Poor Richard”.
  7. Read over Benjamin Franklin’s aphorisms and the virtues associated with them.
  8. Choose 3 aphorisms from the list that you like. Write down the meaning of each aphorism and categorize it by whether it is a moral lesson, an implied metaphor, or just a funny comment on life.

Writing

  1. Read over the article Reflective Writing: a basic introduction.
  2. Take notes to help you in your essay planning.

Day 14

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each,  term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: balanced sentencerhetorical questionimagery

Reading

  1. Read about Patrick Henry.
  2. Read Patrick Henry’s “Give Me Liberty or Give Me Death” speech.
  3. Write a paragraph responding to Henry’s speech. How did it make you feel? What made his arguments powerful? How did he appeal to logic? How did he appeal to emotion?
  4. How does Henry use rhetorical questions in his speech?
  5. What Biblical and mythological allusions does Henry make in his speech? How would each allusion relate to what was happening in 1775? You may look these up to help you answer.
    1. “We are apt to . . . listen to the song of that siren, till she transforms us into beasts.” (Odyssey, Books 10 and 12)
    2. “Are we disposed to be of the number of those who, having eyes, see not, and having ears, hear not the things which so nearly concern their temporal salvation?” (Ezekiel 12:2)
    3. “Suffer not yourselves to be betrayed with a kiss.” (Luke 22:47-48)
  6. Read about Thomas Paine.
  7. Read the summary of Common Sense.
  8. Read The Crisis by Thomas Paine (just the first page is needed).
  9. What emotions does Paine appeal to? List a few examples of where Paine makes appeals.
  10. Persuasive writers uses metaphors and analogies in their arguments. Paine uses an analogy connecting the King of Britain with a thief. What point is he trying to make using this analogy?

Writing

  1. Writing a reflective essay will be similar to how you would write a narrative essay. You will include elements of a narrative: plot, characters, setting, conflict. A common structure for a reflective essay is Introduction, Body, and Conclusion. The event, any main characters, and the setting will all be “introduced” within your introduction.
  2. Introductions do not need to be longer than one paragraph. Give your purpose of your paper, but don’t give too much detail in the introduction. The details should be saved for the body of the paper. Your introduction is just a preview of what is to come in your paper.

Day 15

Unit: The Romantic Period (1830-1870)

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each,  term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: point of viewprosecolloquialism

Reading

  1. Just in time for us to begin discussing the Romantic Period in American Literature, today you should be done The Scarlet Letter as well as pages 13-17 of the study guide.
  2. Go over your completed study guide papers with your parent/guardian.
  3. Take the quiz for The Scarlet Letter. Record your grade out of 24 instead of 25. This gives you the potential for extra credit.

Writing

  1. Write a Response to Literature for the final portion or a response to the entirety of The Scarlet Letter. Review the instructions for Response to Literature assignments in the course description at the top of this page.
  2. Record your score out of 30 on the grading sheet using the rubric.

Day 16

Vocabulary

  1. Record these words and their definitions in your notes. Click on each,  term and summarize its definition so you have a clear understanding of its meaning: allegoryfree verseanaphora

Reading

  1. Read “Making Connections” for the “Beginnings to 1820”.
  2. Read the “Overview for 1820-1865”.
  3. Read more about Nathaniel Hawthorne.
  4. We are going to read the short story, Young Goodman Brown. Print off page 18 of your study guide to complete alongside of your reading.
  5. Before you read the story, read this article in the Commending the Classics series, discussing the literary conventions and context.
  6. Read Young Goodman Brown.
  7. Read the follow up to the Commending the Classics article, discussing the substance and style of the book.
    Use the discussion questions at the end of the article to write a Response to Literature. Review the instructions for Response to Literature assignments in the course description at the top of this page. Record your score out of 30 on the grading sheet using the rubric.

Writing

  1. The body of your reflective essay is where it is most like a narrative. You are recreating an event and giving specific details. Your job here is to make it clear to the reader the reasons this event is significant.
  2. Your event should be well developed. It may be a series of events or incidents that you’ll need to describe effectively. Give background information that is relevant. Be sure your events are organized clearly. If you are using chronological order, make sure that is known. You can also incorporate flashbacks, but you’ll need to be careful that this is not confusing to the reader. Keep a consistent point of view.
  3. It is important that you remember enough about the situation or event to be able to write about it and to maintain interest in it (both for yourself and the reader).